Seattle Seahawks

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SEAHAWKS

Seattle Seahawks

Coach: Pete Carroll
OC: Brian Schottenheimer

Depth Chart:

QB: Russell Wilson, Paxton Lynch, Geno Smith
RBs: Chris Carson, Rashaad Penny, JD McKissic, CJ Prosise, Bo Scarbrough, Travis Homer, Marcelias Sutton
FBs: Nick Bellore
WRs: Tyler Lockett, DK Metcalf, David Moore, Jaron Brown, Malik Turner, Amara Darboh, Keenan Reynolds, Gary Jennings, Terry Wright, John Ursua, Jazz Ferguson, Caleb Scott
TEs: Nick Vannett, Will Dissly, Jacob Hollister, Ed Dickson, Tyrone Swoopes, Justin Johnson

2019 Draft (offense only):

Round 2, Pick 64 – WR- DK Metcalf – Ole Miss
 Round 4, Pick 120 – WR – Gary Jennings Jr – West Virginia
Round 4, Pick 124 – OG – Phil Haynes – Wake Forest
Round 6, Pick 200 – RB – Travis Homer – Miami

2019 Undrafted Free Agents (fantasy offense only):

RB – Marcelias Sutton – Oklahoma
WR – Terry Wright – Purdue
WR – John Ursua – Hawaii
TE – Justin Johnson – Mississippi State

Key Offseason Additions (fantasy offense):

QB – Paxton Lynch
QB – Geno Smith
TE – Jacob Hollister

Training Camp Preview: Rookies 7/17, Veterans 7/24

Pete Carroll enters his 10th year as the Seahawks head coach.  Brian Schottenheimer returns for his second year as the offensive coordinator.  Seattle finished 18th in total offense last year, 27th in passing and 1st in rushing.  They were tied for 7th in scoring with 26.8pts per game.  Seattle wants to be a run first team, but can support fantasy receivers because Russell Wilson throws TDs, just not for many yards.
Russell Wilson became the league’s highest paid player in April.  He finished as the QB10 last year with 3,448 passing yards, 35 TDs and 376 yards rushing.  It was his first year without recording a rushing touchdown.  He’s being draft around the QB8 range right now, usually in the 8th round.  I’m open to snagging my starting quarterback in the 8th/9th rounds this year, and I could argue Wilson’s passing numbers are set to improve.  His 35 passing TDs might come down a couple, but his passing yardage is sure to go up.  The Seahawks lost some key pieces to their defense and will be in more pass-heavy game scripts early in the year.  He’s a dark horse to finish as a top 5 QB this year.  Behind him, Paxton Lynch and Geno Smith will battle for the main backup job.
Chris Carson led the team in rushing last year and finished as the RB15.  He ran for 1,151 yards and 9 TDs while adding 20 catches for 163 yards.  Rashaad Penny is set for more work behind him, but Mike Davis left in free agency, leaving behind 112 carries and 42 targets.  Carson’s ADP is around RB28, while Penny’s is around RB32.  This doesn’t make sense to me.  Penny will have a chance to get the head start in camp while Davis is coming back from some minor off-season clean up surgery.  But Carson is the better player right now.  He won’t add much in the passing game, but either will Penny.  We should be expecting JD McKissic to get the majority of passing work, but not enough for us to be interested in redraft leagues.  I love Carson at ADP, and I even like Penny at his because of the touches Davis leaves behind.  Seattle is a run first team and if either Carson or Penny misses time, we rank the healthy player as an RB1.  We’ll monitor the backup competition between CJ Prosise, Bo Scarbrough, 6th round draft pick Travis Homer and Marcelias Sutton.
Doug Baldwin has officially retired, leaving Tyler Lockett atop the depth chart.  Lockett will move into Baldwin’s slot role, freeing up two outside receiving spots for David Moore, Jaron Brown and 2nd round pick DK Metcalf.  Metcalf will be one of the most interesting players to watch in the pre-season, but for now, he’s behind Moore and Brown.  Lockett finished last year as the WR16 with 57 receptions for 965 yards and 10 TDs.  His volume is about to spike up and is likely to crack 1,000 receiving yards.  His TD total could remain around 10, but is likely to come down a notch.  His ADP is around WR24 and is a great buy in the 4th and sometimes 5th round.  We probably aren’t trusting any of the other Seattle WRs on draft day, but we must monitor this starting receiver battle between Brown, Moore and Metcalf.  Metcalf has the highest upside for sure, but all three WRs will be boom bust and are probably better used in best ball leagues.  After the top four, we have 4th round pick Gary Jennings Jr and UDFAs Jazz Ferguson, Terry Wright and John Ursua.  Jennings should be a lock to make the roster, but the other three will be competing with Malik Turner, Amara Darboh, Keenan Reynolds and Caleb Scott.  I like Ferguson the most out of the group.  Monitor this WR battle throughout the pre-season.
The tight end group is interesting in Seattle.  Will Dissly returns from his patellar tendon injury back in Week 4 last year.  He was supposed to just be a blocking TE, but he was impressive as a receiver in training camp and that followed through the first few weeks of the season.  I’m into Dissly for dynasty leagues, and might be willing the snag him as my last pick in redraft once we see him back on the field this August.  For now, Nick Vannett, Ed Dickson and Jacob Hollister will all be getting a chance to run with the 1s.  Seattle will likely end up using all four of these tight ends throughout the season, so the correct answer might just be to draft nobody until we get some clarity.  Tyrone Swoopes and Justin Johnson round out the rest of the group.

2017-2018 Stats Below:

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